Feature

A change in the air

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  25 Jun 2021:
Vol. 372, Issue 6549, pp. 1382-1385
DOI: 10.1126/science.372.6549.1382

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

More than 20 years ago, a small group of early career Black atmospheric scientists created a new graduate program at Howard University in Washington, D.C. The Howard program has turned into an influential success in what otherwise remains a very white discipline: From 2006 to 2018, Howard produced more than half of the United States's Black doctorate holders in atmospheric science. Its faculty recruited from overlooked colleges and created rigorous scientific field campaigns for its students. Its students have now gone on to influential positions at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and elsewhere. But the program has also faced challenges: Nearly all of its original faculty have left, burned out by the strain of building careers and a program at once. And although its students have gone to federal agencies, few have found purchase in traditional academic departments.

View Full Text

Stay Connected to Science